57 of Gaynor’s cherries

In 1994 I was at a club called the Heavenly Social in Great Portland Street where the Chemical Brothers used to DJ.  A guy named Hamish Brown snapped me raving in an alcove with Milo Speedwagon, Tabitha Queens of Noize, and other friends of the era.  The picture popped up in a new magazine aimed at men, called Loaded.  I was finished with art college after a year’s foundation; I’d had an exhibition in Portobello Road and thought if I was going to be an artist, education wasn’t going to help.  So I dropped out, worked in an Accessorize at Heathrow Airport and went out a lot, often getting dropped off at the airport for an early shift having been out all night.  After work one day I went into Loaded to get a copy of the photo, back then it was possible to walk into media without getting stopped by security (who incidentally was one out of two people who weren’t white working at IPC Media at the time).  I followed Michael Holden’s arse up the stairs, met Mick Bunnage (Modern Toss) and Martin Deeson, and possibly James Brown, I don’t remember…but asked them if they had any jobs going.  They did, as a PA to the editor, so I went and learnt how to type, sent weird but funny post into the office, and got shortlisted down to the final two candidates from a hundred or so.  In the final interview, I was told I’d make a shite secretary but a great journalist, and they offered to train me.  Gaynor Perry got the job as PA.  She was always in bands, and painting in her spare time, and I recently ran into her, and she’s working with Art Hertz on some genuinely fascinating photography projects.  Here’s a portrait she did of me a few weeks ago:

www.gaynorperry.com

http://gaynorgaynorperry.blogspot.com/

Her blog’s supercool.

Okay, so outfit 57:  

Blahnik rip-offs, Zara. Jacket, Adidas. Shades, Celine. Dress, McQ.

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One thought on “57 of Gaynor’s cherries

  1. IPC media – then IPC magazines – used to live next door but one to me in Long Acre, but they were still heavily into old fashioned mags with falling sales and 1950’s formats then.

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